Stop bitching!!!

I greet you with hands clasped together in gratitude.
Stop bitching!!!! Stop complaining!!!! Stop whining!!!! I mean seriously! Other than a simple, easy way to vent, does it really help?
Right about now your screaming at your screen telling me to shut up. Maybe you’re even telling me that I don’t know how difficult your life is, what kind of stressors your dealing with in your life, etc. Honestly it doesn’t matter. We all  have stressors in our lives. Sure, some are more difficult to manage than others while others may even seem insurmountable, but honestly bitching about how bad your life is and how no one ever understands you is a waste of valuable time and energy.
Bitching is reactive. If you believe you have the right to bitch and bitching is helpful, please do not read further. If you’d like to make an attempt at being more proactive in your response, please continue to read on.
These are just a few simple steps which I take because I can find myself in the same scenario and if the conditions are right, I can  find myself falling off the wagon and bitching.
The first step which I take is to stop using words like “can’t” and phrases like “I can’t.” If you believe you “can’t” you are correct and again you should not read further. This phrase drives me nuts and if in a conversation with someone who continues to use it, I will walk away. I run for fun and exercise and am often asked how  far I run. I plan on 4-5 7-mile runs each week. I am also often asked where I find the time to rise at 4AM to run and I respond, “I don’t find the time; I make the time.” Then I hear, “I can’t do that…” which is followed by a number of excuses. The bottom line is if you truly want to do something, get up and do it. If you can’t because there is a true impediment to accomplishing this task, ask for help. If the person or persons you have asked for help are not helpful, ask someone else. Many symptoms of “anxiety” and “depression” result from our refusal to make sometimes difficult decisions right now which will impact us positively in the future. We are afraid to make a decision, afraid to fail, afraid to make a wrong decision.
The second step I take is to assess the control I have over whatever the stressor is. We have more control over a great deal of our life than we believe we do. I’m not talking about the ultimate control which results in stopping a situation from happening but perhaps there is enough control to impact the outcome. Again, I introduce the word “can’t” and the phrase “I can’t.”
The third step is to assess what help and  resources you need. Is this something simple? “I feel anxious when I watch the news.” Stop watching the news or in the advent of 24-hour news, stop watching as a story is repeated again and again and again and again. Is this something more complex? My garage needs a new roof. Do I have the skills? No? Hire someone to do it.” If you can and want to do it yourself, what do you need to have in place to make this endeavor a success? Plan it and do it. The more involved the situation, the more involved the plan and the more resources we may need. Sometimes the help we need is professional help. There is nothing wrong with asking for help. It amazes me everyday how people will bitch at how bad their life is and not ask for help and often when help is available and offered, it is rejected.
The fourth step is go out and make it happen. You have set a plan, identified the resources you’ll need to be successful and have embarked on activating the plan. Go out and make it happen. A good plan, even the best plan will have faults because we’re human and we cannot think of everything. No worries…go back to the drawing board. No one tells us this is an option and many of us are afraid of failing. So what! You aren’t the first person to fail and you won’t be the last. I hate to burst your bubble but if you believe you are never going to not be successful doing something…it is amazing to me how wrong you are.
I believe it’s the word “failure” that scares us. Many of us were raised to believe that failure which is also known as “not being successful” is a bad thing. We are afraid to fail. So many of us are paralyzed by that fear and we refuse to even try because “what will people think if I’ve failed?” What will people think if you don’t try? What will you think if you don’t try?
There is a simple question I ask myself everyday especially when I am frustrated and am experiencing some difficulty seeing my way out of a problem. The question is “What am I thankful for today?” It may seem like a stupid or ridiculous question but I’ll bet you’ll have a great deal of difficulty identifying what you are grateful or thankful for in your life. I don’t care if what you come up with especially initially sounds cliché. That’s sad. Many of us take our lives for granted. We blame others for the negativity in our lives and then we find ourselves immobilized.”I’m grateful I woke up this morning.” Many people will not wake up today. Celebrate your gratitude for waking up and having the energy to get out of bed and pursue your life.
Life is made up of healthy doses of fear with a little anxiety mixed in for good measure. These aren’t bad things. These are the ingredients which make life a little more spicy and worth living.
I have a hope for everyone. That hope is simple…May you be able to step back from whatever stressors are building in your life and assess the amount of control you have over those life issues. Don’t be afraid to ask for help if that’s what you need and don’t be afraid to fail.
Namaste

Death

It is with hands grasped in gratitude and thoughtfulness for Anthony, Harold, my family, my life and those whose paths my life has crossed which I write.
Last Sunday evening I lay in bed reading from my Kindle. The light of the screen the only light illuminating the room. I put down my Kindle and glanced at my Facebook feed. To my surprise, I was informed of the death of Harold Nichols. Harold was 53 and was murdered in Jamaica. Harold and his wife had lived in Jamaica for approximately 15 years and were missionaries for a local church. Harold and his wife selflessly provided to others what those individuals were unable to provide for themselves.
Tuesday, while sitting at my desk, I heard a ping. I was unable to identify the source until I closed several windows on my computer screen and found a message from a previous coworker. The message informed me of another death. this one a 56 y.o. male with whom I had worked.
Both individuals were quiet and humble and caused those of us who are introspective to examine our place in the world as well as what we offer to the world. This news comes to me just 6.5 days into the start of a new job. I left my last job as a result of the stress which I have felt for the past year and which I was concerned would result in more significant complications
As I was writing this post, a message popped up on my computer indicating the arrival of a new email. I opened the email and found this message forwarded to me from a friend.
Keanu is 50. He posted this photo and this message: “You see these people behind me? They are rushing to work and not paying attention to anything. Sometimes we get so caught up in our daily lives that we forget to take the time out. Say Hi to someone you see and maybe give a hug to someone who looks like they’re hurting. Help out someone. You have to live every day like it’s your last. The person who was holding you back from your happiness was you. Every day is precious so let’s treat it like that. Tomorrow isn’t guaranteed, so live today!”
Keanu
I am sitting outside on this Mother’s Day, enjoying the warmth of the sun on my face the taste of a fine cigar mingling with the smooth taste of a glass of scotch not taking anything for granted. As I grow older I realize with more certainty that another day is not promised to any of us. I have also learned to accept this fact and live my life accordingly. I rise each morning and go for a run. My pace is slower but that matters none to me. What is important is that I have the ability to still run.
Run I will. I will also continue to live each day to the best of my ability not complaining when things do not go my way but accepting what is and changing what I can.
Namaste.

Why do I run?

I greet you with hands clasped in prayer and gratitude.

I was asked this question the other day, “Why do I run?” I am unsure why I chose to write about this topic today as I am asked this question with some frequency. The question is “Why do I run?”

I jotted down some thoughts…It is just after 4:00 am. I was dreaming about a trail run which I had recently completed in the Adirondacks. As I rose and dressed for my run, thoughts, as they often do at this time of day crept in and challenged my belief to stay in bed and get more sleep. I think of a photo of Rob Krar on my wall, his bouts with depression and my need for solitude which helps to contribute to the balanced start of my day.

I know within the first few steps of my morning run that I have what it takes to beat my demons.

I run to be awake. I run as a reminder of what I am capable of achieving. I run for my father who can no longer walk. I run because it is an opportunity to be alone with my thoughts and reexamine my passion for the process of change, both in my life and in the life of my clients.I run because it allows me to challenge myself and to give me some modicum of control over the life stressors which I encounter over which I have little or no control.

I run to be a better person, a better father, grandfather and husband. I run because I have the ability to see the world, my world through a different set of eyes, a set of eyes through which I can see the morning sunrise as the rays of light leak through the branches of the nearby trees. I run to stop running; to feel the stillness and the quiet as I sit on my front porch after a run while everyone else remains safely tucked in their beds. I run to enjoy the solitude and quiet which I seem to only be able to achieve after a vigorous run.

I run to think about the people I have in my life, those who I love and those who I can do without. I think about the latter and I say a mantra for them in the hope they may find the same peace I have been able to find. I run for them. I run to release the stress in my life. I run because it reminds me of the importance of humility in my life. I run to remember and to forget. I run because of the order which I find during this time of solitude. I run to feel and experience the emotions which we all feel and too often deny because we are afraid. I run because it’s free and because it allows me to feel free.

Namaste

 

 

 

I am home…again

I write with hands clasped in gratitude and in prayer.

I returned from an all too brief trip to the Adirondacks. There are an equal number of philosophical questions remaining as there were prior to my departure. This quote from Charles Bukowski is cause for my continued reflection. Charles said, “The freeway always reminds you of what most people are. It´s a competitive society. They want you to lose so they can win.” This concept of competitiveness is one which I no longer comprehend. I barely comprehended this concept when I was younger and am unsure that I ever did. Perhaps it is age and the accompanying maturity. Competitiveness is a concept with which I struggle, especially as I grow older. In the four days which I spent in the Adirondacks, I spoke to no more than four people. Two of those “conversations” were to place an order for food so I am unsure if they qualify for the definition of “conversation”.

I arrived on the Rock River trail and breathed a sigh of relief that there were no cars at the trailhead. This meant, at least for the time being that this would be a solitary trail run. As I approached the sign in, a smile formed on my lips as I noticed there were no other signatures indicating hikers or trail runners remaining on the trail. After signing in at the trailhead, I began my trail run on a soft, leaf covered trail. The sound of the leaves crunching beneath my feet and the trees bare of leaves, reminded me of Fall. This trail, I am guessing is a seldom used trail. I worked my way over a few rolling hills before descending to a low-land area with Rock Lake on my right.

Rock Lake

I was able to see the lake through the trees which, at this time of year remain naked. The buds on the accompanying branches not yet exposing their secret. Another hundred yards down the trail and I heard the sound of water cascading over large rocks. This would be Rock Creek. I stood in the middle of the footbridge spanning the creek, the sound of the creek louder than I had expected considering the width of the creek was no more than ten feet. I was reminded that everything, especially to me is louder than what would be expected in the Adirondacks. I was also reminded of this fact as I perused the headstones in a cemetery at the entrance to the park. A break in traffic passing the cemetery left me in total silence save for what appeared to be a buzzing in my ears. Perhaps the buzzing was me adjusting from the constant bombardment of noise to the profoundness of the Adirondack silence.

Rock Creek

John Burroughs in “The Art of Seeing Things” said, “If I were to name the three most precious resources of life, I should say books, friends, and nature; and the greatest of these, at least the most constant and always at hand, is nature. Nature we have always with us, an inexhaustible storehouse of that which moves the heart, appeals to the mind, and fires the imagination,—health to the body, a stimulus to the intellect, and joy to the soul. To the scientist Nature is a storehouse of facts, laws, processes; to the artist she is a storehouse of pictures; to the poet she is a storehouse of images, fancies, a source of inspiration; to the moralist she is a storehouse of precepts and parables; to all she may be a source of knowledge and joy.”

ADK1

As I made my way back on this 3-mile out and back trail, I decided to branch off onto another trail. This trail was no longer marked by the “hiking” blazes but by red “snowmobile” blazes. This trail was wider and marked by more frequent changes in elevation. It also extended this run from 6 miles to 14.5 miles with an elevation gain of over 1000′.

In his book, “The Art of Seeing Things”, John Burroughs shared the following thought, “So far as seeing things is an art, it is the art of keeping your eyes and ears open. The art of nature is all in the direction of concealment. The birds, the animals, all the wild creatures, for the most part try to elude your observation. The art of the bird is to hide her nest; the art of the game you are in quest of is to make itself invisible. The flower seeks to attract the bee and the moth by its color and perfume, because they are of service to it; but I presume it would hide from the excursionists and the picnickers if it could, because they extirpate it. Power of attention and a mind sensitive to outward objects, in these lies the secret of seeing things. Can you bring all your faculties to the front, like a house with many faces at the doors and windows; or do you live retired within yourself, shut up in your own meditations? The thinker puts all the powers of his mind in reflection: the observer puts all the powers of his mind in perception; every faculty is directed outward; the whole mind sees through the eye and hears through the ear. He has an objective turn of mind as opposed to a subjective. A person with the latter turn of mind sees little. If you are occupied with your own thoughts, you may go through a museum of curiosities and observe nothing.”

Path

Little could have been more beautiful this day. Sunlight began to drift through the bare limbs of the many trees. Silence, other than my breathing and footfalls was my musical accompaniment. Grtatitude for my breath. Gratitude for my eyes and my ability to take in such beautiful sights. Gratitude for my ears both to hear the sounds around me as well as to hear the silence in which I find so much solitude.

May you be able to experience such beauty in your life.

Namaste

 

I’m home…

It is with clasped hands together in prayer and with much gratitude that I greet you…

I’m home…or what I refer to as my second home. Next to the Gulf of Mexico, the Adirondack region is one where I could easily make a life. It’s been almost two years since I’ve made the short trip up North. Excuses have been many.

Last week I left my job as the Director of Social Work at Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center. This was a job which I desperately needed to leave. I spent the last 11 months and two weeks, but who’s counting. I have allowed this position to drain every ounce of energy and desire from me.

I’ve spoken with individuals who know me and have been emotionally supportive of me and they knew I could have persevered and hung on. One friend saying, “I know you can do it. But how much longer do you want to do it?” I didn’t want to do it anymore. The stress accompanying the position started to damage my health; physically and emotionally. My blood pressure rose, I added weight and despite the relatively mild winter, I found myself running only a handful of times during the first two months of the year. My desire to run was strong, but my desire to rise at 4:00 AM to do so was lacking. An afternoon runner I never was.

ADK

Somewhere along the way, I lost myself. I forgot what I stood for and simply rose each day going through the motions. I ran on autopilot. Anyone knows, if you run on autopilot too long without monitoring the traffic around you, you’ll eventually crash. I left just before the crash.

I decided to take a week off from my practice and take time for me. Some me time. When I have taken time off previously, unless I have left the area I still met with patients in my practice. My wife was surprised to know I had nothing of importance to anyone but me scheduled for the week.

Lake Akanabee

As Henry David once said, “Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you’ve imagined. As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler.” I will go now confidently in the direction of my dreams. Identify your dreams and go after them.

Namaste

Am I Living the Life I want to Live?

I woke this morning after a fitful night of sleep. I slept poorly and I am guessing because of the cold which has been my companion since late Thursday. Running these last few weeks has been almost nonexistent save for the one run I have added to each week. There has been little desire to run and even a smaller desire to rise at 4 AM.
This is typical for me this time of year. The weather becomes increasingly colder and the days shorter. January brings us to the “middle” of winter. I am happy to see winter beginning to come to an end. The days begin to grow increasingly longer as the amount of daylight steadily increases. This visual representation of lengthening days is often enough to help improve my mood. The hope of spring in the air, literally and figuratively. Since I began writing this entry more than a week has gone by. There has been a desire to write but little time. The weather has dramatically changed and the unseasonable temperatures grew colder and brought with them snow. Last Sunday, the last day I ran, the air temperature dropped to a low of negative 16. The photo shows what happens to one when one decides to exercise in those elements.
Frozen selfie
This time of year for me is normally a time of quiet introspection but even that has been decreased. I have found the time which I have spent writing in my journal has even decreased. My goal has always been to write every day. Often a week or more has gone by between journal pages. Today, the temperatures are approximately 10-degrees colder than yesterday when we reached a high of 51. The majority of the snow has melted and despite the colder temperatures, I needed to go outside. This is where I feel more at ease and more calm. My domain has never been inside. Inside is where I must be to accomplish the tasks associated with my job.
When I woke I reviewed the photos which had been added to my Instagram stream since I last checked at 3:00 AM. Many photos caught my eye but one also grabbed hold of my emotions like a lasso thrown around the neck of a bucking bronco.
This caption accompanied the photo:
“I’ve often imagined that trees keep their favorite humans as pets, since their lifespans are much longer than ours. Much the same way we keep cats and dogs. They watch over us, love us, and after we pass they mourn us. They adopt new humans after we’ve gone. Like ants scrambling madly in an ant farm, we don’t fully recognize their ownership or their care. Science is slowly discovering the sentient qualities of trees, but some of us have been sharing these friendships for centuries.”
—Vanessa “Runs” Rodriguez 
 Trees
I was and continue to be drawn to this photo. I find myself staring at it as I gaze at the previously blank wall across from my cluttered desk. I find myself staring at times when I have allowed my day to become unbalanced. Poor food intake, plus poor sleep, plus allowing myself to overwork is what often leads to this imbalance.
Yesterday I drove home from my office in Niagara Falls and to the west, my right eye caught the bright orange glare of the setting sun. Another mile down the road I pulled into a parking lot which runs parallel to the upper Niagara River. I backed the Element into a parking space which offered an unobstructed view of this beautiful sight. I rolled down the window and listened to the beautiful sounds which gently enveloped my ears. A gentle breeze caused the naked branches of trees to harmoniously rub together while a family of geese sounded their approach as their beautiful wings allowed them to gently touchdown in the still unfrozen water. A smile crossed my lips and within a few minutes, the memories and stress of the day were washed away.
When I look at or rather stare at Vanessa’s photo, I see the beauty of these elegant trees, her gentle touch on the bark of these gentle giants and the path which has been worn on the surface of this beautiful forest. My thoughts drift to my time spent in the woods behind my house, or the trails which I am privileged to run and snowshoe enjoying the solitude provided by the relative absence of the rest of society. I think of my time spent in the Adirondacks where this same solitude passionately grips me.
Are you living the life you want to live? Are any of us living the life we want to live? Do we realize there is a space to live the life of which I fear many of us dream but never attempt beyond the expectations of family, ourselves and society in general?
These expectations are dangerous and for the majority of us they are never fully revealed. We live our life in a dreamlike state agreeable to be “weekend warriors” while we may harbor dreams of something more; more freedom. We are tied to a paycheck and their belief that we need to make more money. We fail to realize this need to make more money comes with more responsibility which takes away the one thing which none of us are guaranteed, more time. I recall hearing this fear on a daily basis. “Be glad you have a job. It may not be the job you want but it’s a paycheck.”
It is becoming uncomfortable to sit outside any longer. I ask you to ask yourself if you are living the life of which you dream or are you living a life which you believe you must live and hope there will be time later to live.
Namaste

I am tired and frustrated…

It is with hands clasped in prayer and with much gratitude which I  greet you.
I had one of those days today and yesterday and the day before. It is what it is. I expect to have some of “those” days from tinme to time.
My frustration is not with “those” days. My frustration is with “those” people with whom  I am forced to interact and those with whom I choose to interact. It is with their rudeness, self-importance, disrespect and failure to acknowledge another or their own indiscretion.
I see others smile infrequently. When I smile, I am often asked, “Why are you in such a good mood?” or “Why are you smiling?” I smile often and frequently because it helps pick up my mood when I am feeling down. I smile because it helps others to pick up their mood when they are feeling down.
I read this quote from the Dalai Lama. He said, “When you help others, do so out of respect. Don’t look down on them. Serve other human beings with a compassionate intent.” I do this frequently. I would say “all of the time” and more than likely be accurate but I am not perfect. I do have a pretty intact value system which does not allow me to treat others poorly and disrespectfully regardless of what is going in their life without feeling intense pangs of guilt. It’s my moral compass, my true north.
I have but one question…”Why can’t others do the same?” I would even find it acceptable if the guy who sits in the hall who I walk by and say “Hi” would return this simple acknowledgement. It really is the “little things.” I don’t need a million dollars to be happy. A smile, a tip of the hat, a “good day to you” from time-to-time would be nice.
I have a hope for all of my readers…HAVE AN AMAZING DAY! Help others to have an amazing day. It really doesn’t take much. You don’t need to pay it forward in the coffee line, although that would be nice. Let’s just try to each be a little bit nice to each other throughout the day.
Namaste